While we were in Australia, we adopted the . . . plan . . . of (1)digging deep trenches and filling them in with (2)dressing that would create good soil. This we did in the cultivation of tomatoes, oranges, lemons, peaches, and grapes.  {3SM 328.1}

The man of whom we purchased our peach trees told me that he would be pleased to have me observe the way they were planted. I then asked him to let me show him how it had been represented in the night season that they should be planted. I ordered my hired man to (1)dig a deep cavity in the ground, then (2)put in rich dirt, (3)then stones, (4)then rich dirt. (5)After this he put in layers of earth and dressing until the hole was filled. I told the nurseryman that I had planted in this way in the rocky soil in America. I invited him to visit me when these fruits should be ripe. He said to me, “You need no lesson from me to teach you how to plant the trees.”  {3SM 328.2}

Our crops were very successful. The peaches were the most beautiful in coloring, and the most delicious in flavor of any that I had tasted. We grew the large yellow Crawford and other varieties, grapes, apricots, nectarines, and plums.–Letter 350, 1907.

STEP ONE: DIGGING DEEP TRENCHES, 3 FEETS DEEP AND WIDE

 

STEP TWO: PUT IN RICH DIRT

STEP THREE: PUT IN STONES/PEBBLES

 

STEP FOUR: ADD RICH DIRT AGAIN

 

STEP FIVE: ADD TOP SOIL

STEP SIX: PLANT THE FRUIT TREE. 

You will plant your fruit tree on the top soil about three centimeters down.

Sometimes there is a need to protect the root and the shoot of the young fruit tree. This can be achieved by putting a wire gauze or by cutting a metallic or plastic tin and inserting into the soil, letting the young plant grow in the middle of the gauze or plastic tin.

The attention required in transplanting, that not even a root fiber shall be crowded or misplaced, the care of the young plants, the pruning and watering, the shielding from frost at night and sun by day, keeping out weeds, disease, and insect pests, the training and arranging, not only teach important lessons concerning the development of character, but the work itself is a means of development. In cultivating carefulness, patience, attention to detail, obedience to law, it imparts a most essential training. The constant contact with the mystery of life and the loveliness of nature, as well as the tenderness called forth in ministering to these beautiful objects of God’s creation, tends to quicken the mind and refine and elevate the character.  {AH 142.3}

 

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